Surprisingly, there are 7 towns in New York State that don't allow liquor to be sold...at all. I'm going to be very honest, I could NEVER live in a dry town or county. Sorry, not sorry. I 'needs' my wine, period!

Here in New York, it seems like our liquor laws are decent. They aren't too restrictive, but one thing that has always annoyed me is not being able to purchase liquor until after 12 pm on Sunday.

A Bill passed in the NYS Senate to allow liquor stores to open earlier, at 10 am, on Sundays. Changing the opening times of liquor stores to 10 am will definitely make life a little easier for everyone having a Sunday Funday or checking out some early afternoon football games.

However, in 7 towns here in the state, it won't make any difference because they are dry. While counties in New York cannot decide to prohibit alcohol sales, towns and cities can. These towns are in the middle of 'nowhere' New York, so any resident that does want to partake in the spirits will have to go to church...or take a drive to the nearest town that does permit alcohol sales.

These 7 Towns In New York State Don't Allow Alcohol Sales:

1. Caneadea in Allegany County

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Caneadea is a town in Allegany County, New York, United States. The population was 2,542 at the 2010 census. The name is of Seneca language origin and means 'where the heavens rest on earth.'

2. Clymer in Chautauqua

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Clymer is a town in Chautauqua County, New York, United States. The population was 1,698 at the 2010 census. The town is named for George Clymer, a signer of the Declaration of Independence. Clymer is located in the southwest part of the county.

3. Lapeer in Cortland County

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Lapeer is a town in Cortland County, New York, United States. The population was 767 at the 2010 census. Lapeer is on the southern border of Cortland County and is south of the city of Cortland.

4. Orwell in Oswego County

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Orwell is a town in Oswego County, New York, United States. The population was 1,167 at the 2010 census. The town was named after Orwell, Vermont. The Town of Orwell is in the north-central part of the county.

5. Fremont in Steuben County

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Fremont is a town in Sullivan County, New York, United States. The population was 1,381 at the 2010 census. The Town of Fremont is in the northwestern part of the county.

6. Jasper in Steuben County

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Jasper is a town located in Steuben County, New York, United States. As of the 2010 census, the town had a total population of 1,424. The name is that of a military hero at Fort Moultrie, William Jasper. The Town of Jasper is in the southwestern part of the county, west of Corning.

7. Berkshire in Tioga County

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Berkshire is a town in Tioga County, New York, United States. As of the 2010 census, it had a population of 1,412. The town is named after Berkshire County, Massachusetts. The Town of Berkshire is in the northeastern part of the county and is northwest of Binghamton and southeast of Ithaca.

In addition to the 7 dry towns above, there are partially dry towns in New York State,

Ten towns forbid on-premises consumption but allow off-premises; four allow both only at a hotel open year-round. Seventeen disallow only special on-premises consumption. The town of Spencer in Tioga County allows only off-premises and special on-premises consumption. Williamson, in Wayne County, bans on-premises sale of beer at race tracks, outdoor athletic fields and sports stadia where admission is charged. In all, there are 39 partially dry towns.

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Before you decide to consume cannabis and then illegally drive under the influence in New York, you should know the real cost of your decision. Not only will you have to pay up in dollars, but you'll also pay with time, a hit to your license, and possibly injury or death.

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