The Buffalo Zoo has announced that they've got new baby lion cubs! They've done the gender reveal.  Now, they need some names and they're looking for your help.

They've gone 2 months without names and now it's time...

In March, the Buffalo Zoo announced that Lusaka and Tiberius, two lions who live there, were the proud parents to two baby cubs.  In April they shared the first pictures of the two and did a gender reveal with the help of their father Tiberius.  We know that there's a little boy and a little girl.

It's now May and they're looking for names for them.

How can I be a part of it?

They're looking for your help.  You can help to decide what the cubs' names will be and help a great cause at the same time.  The zoo is hoping that you will vote on the names.  They've been narrowed down to 6 different names by the keepers there.

What are the choices?

For the male they've got:

Neo

Khari

Augustus

 

For the female, the choices are:

Zhara

Zawadi

Dahlia

 

How does it work?

The zoo is asking you to go to this website to vote for your favorite.  They will be raising money for a charity with your vote.  Each vote costs one dollar and the money will go to support the Buffalo Zoo and the Association of Zoos & Aquariums Lion SAFE (Saving Animals From Extinction) Program.

According to the Buffalo Zoo, over the last 25 years, lion populations in Africa have been nearly cut in half. The the SAFE African lion team hopes to double the number of lions in the wild by 2050.  This is just one little way that you can help...and have a say in what the little cubs get named!

 

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