Some people get to say "I do" a second time after divorce or the death of a spouse but this is a story of an emotional ceremony the groom may never remember, but the bride will never forget.

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It's a love story similar to "The Notebook". Alzheimer's disease had stolen Peter Marshall's memories, but one thing he forgot was how much he loved and still loves his wife — even if he oftentimes doesn't know her name according to NBC New York.

Peter and his wife, Lisa, have been married for 12 years. But Peter, 56, is battling early-onset Alzheimer's diagnosed a few years ago, so he doesn't remember their wedding happening. He just knows that he loves her.

Last December, Peter had a moment of clarity. The couple was watching a wedding on TV, when he said, "Let's do it." Lisa didn't know how to respond.

"I said, 'Do what?' And he pointed to the TV, to the scene of this wedding and I said, 'Do you wanna get married?' He said yes and had this huge grin on his face," Lisa said. "He doesn't know that I'm his wife. I'm just his favorite person."

Peter got to fall in love all over again and chose Lisa — AGAIN.

"I'm the luckiest girl in the world. I get to do it twice," said Lisa, wiping a tear from her eye.

Her daughter a wedding and event planner put the word out and countless vendors offered their services, for free.

"It was so perfect. I couldn't have dreamt for a better day. It was so magical," said Lisa. "I can't remember seeing him so happy for so long. He was so happy."

Peter's illness is progressing rapidly,  he no longer remembers the vow renewal ceremony from last December. But he does remember there's a woman who loves him and cherishes him always, something he expressed at the wedding.

"He leaned in and he whispered in my ear, 'Thank you for staying,'" Lisa said through tears.

 

 

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Stacker used data from the 2020 County Health Rankings to rank every state's average life expectancy from lowest to highest. The 2020 County Health Rankings values were calculated using mortality counts from the 2016-2018 National Center for Health Statistics. The U.S. Census 2019 American Community Survey and America's Health Rankings Senior Report 2019 data were also used to provide demographics on the senior population of each state and the state's rank on senior health care, respectively.

Read on to learn the average life expectancy in each state.